An Analysis of the “Free Huey” Speech by Kwame Turé

Solyana Bekele “we must develop an undying love for our people, our people.” Kwame Ture Read the Free Huey speech here. Listen to it here. Watch it here. This speech was dedicated to Huey P. Newton (co-founder of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) after the trumped-up charge of 1st-degree murder of a police officer…

Huey Newton: Revolutionary Suicide and Other Works

Revolutionary Suicide The searing, visionary memoir of founding Black Panther Huey P. Newton Eloquently tracing the birth of a revolutionary, Huey P. Newton’s famous and oft-quoted autobiography is as much a manifesto as a portrait of the inner circle of America’s Black Panther Party. From Newton’s impoverished childhood on the streets of Oakland to his…

Huey P. Newton and Martin Luther King Jr.: Revolutionary Love and Unity

Archishman Raju Both Newton and King sought to create a united front for peace and socialism. “Both refused to be dogmatic and creatively synthesized ideas to apply them in their struggle.” We live in times of change, in a world where protest and rebellion but also confusion and anarchy define politics. A new world is…

Black Self-Defense is Important, But Ideology is Paramount

Yafeuh Balogon, a leader of the Dallas-based Huey P. Newton Gun Club, which advocates armed Black self-defense, said the club was inspired by the “founding of the Black Panther Party, more than half a century ago. When armed white supremacists tried to stage a show of force in the Black section of Dallas in 2016,…

Intercommunalism (1974): The Political Thought of Huey P. Newton

Huey P. Newton On September 5, 1970, Huey P. Newton, co-founder of the Black Panther Party (BPP), introduced his theory of intercommunalism at the Revolutionary People’s Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. 1 He later expanded on this theory before an audience at Boston College in November of that year, and then again In February 1971 during…