White People’s Stake in Ending the White Republic

Erin Heaney SURJ members canvassing in Georgia during that state’s 2020 Senate run-off. SURJ focused on turning out white voters to help flip the state, joining the effort led by groups like the New Georgia Project, Black Voters Matter, Working Families Party, and Southerners on New Ground. Photo by Sierra King, Survival Media Agency.  In…

Against Left-Wing White Nationalism

Gerald Horne In “The White Republic and The Struggle for Racial Justice,” Bob Wing contended that the U.S. state is racist to the core, and this has specific implications for our movements’ work going forward, especially the need to replace this racist state with an anti-racist state. Organizing Upgrade is publishing a series of commentaries…

Israel’s Long History of Anti-Black Racism

Angel Nalubega Photo: 1884 illustration of the imperialist Berlin Conference Israel presents itself as a “homeland for all Jews” that welcomes and provides safe haven to all Jewish people. The ironically-named Law of Return, passed on July 5, 1950, declared that all Jewish people had the right to come to live in Israel. But does…

The Class Collaboration of “Justice”

 Erica Caines The rejection of class analysis has, in short, binded many of our liberation efforts into an identity reductionist analysis of race solely. For this reason, the masses are more susceptible to being swayed against their better interests because the packaged messaging of hope and change is delivered by people, the Black petty-bourgeoisie, who…

Return to the Source: Trayvon Martin and White Madness, July 18, 2013

The Black Agenda Review Black people cannot change white people’s warped perceptions of the world, although, Lord knows, we’ve tried. “White folks in general do not think it is racist or evidence of malice to believe that Black males are a prima facie threat; it’s just a fact.” For this edition of Return to the Source,…

Amefricanity: The Black Feminism of Lélia Gonzalez

Raquel Barreto Though a quarter of the total population, black women represent just 2% of the legislative body of Brazil’s federal government, the National Congress. Yet their visibility in public debate has grown radically in recent years with younger activists beginning to occupy spaces in media, academia and the arts. Lélia Gonzalez (1935-1994) has become…