How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective

How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective “If Black women were free, it would mean that everyone else would have to be free.” —Combahee River Collective Statement The Combahee River Collective, a path-breaking group of radical black feminists, was one of the most important organizations to develop out of the antiracist…

Anti- Racism and Anti- Colonialism: An Open Letter to My Black Kin

K.D. Wilson Image description — Black and white photo with a fist raised in the Black Power salute. Some words in white lettering are laid over it, from Ashanti Alston, which read: “I think of being Black not so much as an ethnic category but as an oppositional force or touchstone for looking at situations differently. Black…

Juneteenth: Not Yet Uhuru

Even though, then-U.S. president Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863 proclaiming, “That all persons held as slaves are, and henceforward shall be free,” captured Africans remained in the forcible custody of white people in Texas until June 19, 1865. Many Africans in the U.S. are preparing to celebrate Juneteenth, the holiday…

The Ballot and the Bullet Electoral Campaign School

The Black is Back Coalition for Social Justice, Peace and Reparations convenes for its fourth Electoral Campaign School June 13-14, via Zoom Webinar. The Electoral Campaign School is a means by which the Coalition opens up a new front in the struggle for black self-determination within the U.S. and elsewhere. It will challenge the monopoly…

#OmaliTaughtMe Sunday Study: The Regional Strategy

Uhuru Comrades! For this Sunday’s study we will conclude the “Unity of Theory and Practice” series with the Party’s Regional Strategy, introducing our National Director of Organization Chimurenga Selembao and our regional leaders: Malika, Matumb, Bakari, and Kobina. Join at https://apspuhuru.org

Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture): From Black Power to Pan-Africanism

Whittier College, Whittier, California – March 22, 1971 Stokely Carmichael was the controversial and charismatic young civil rights leader who, in 1966, popularized the phrase “black power.” Carmichael was a leading force in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), working in the Deep South to organize African American voters. In the process he was beaten…

Speaking of Anarchism, Racism and Black Liberation

Lorenzo Kom’boa Ervin May 3, 2015 Originally titled “Anarchism and Racism,” this editorial was written in the early 1990s around the creation of a new publication focused on Black autonomist politics. This is the first issue of the Journal of Anarchy and the Black Revolution, and although I do not think it will be the…

Blacks Need to Organize for Self-Defense

“Whether we’re in large numbers like we are in Mississippi, or in small numbers like in Minnesota, our lives are in jeopardy and it’s important for us to build community networks to defend ourselves,” said Akinyele Umoja, professor of African American Studies at Georgia State University and author of the book, “We Will Shoot Back:…

Kwame Ture: The FBI and CIA

One of Kwames Best Lectures: Kwame Toure’ Delivers a Very Powerful Focus analysis on the FBI CIA & Revolutionary Struggle…

The Weapon of Theory

Amilcar Cabral Address delivered to the first Tricontinental Conference of the Peoples of Asia, Africa and Latin America held in Havana in January, 1966. If any of us came to Cuba with doubts in our mind about the solidity, strength, maturity and vitality of the Cuban Revolution, these doubts have been removed by what we…

Black People Have a Right to Rebel

Lorenzo Kom’boa Ervin July 29, 2005 Lorenzo Komboa Ervin’s analysis of the place of the 2001 Cincinnati riots within the history of US urban riots and the struggle against racism. A massive anti-cop rebellion has broken out in Cincinnati over the police shootings of 15 Black men, ranging in ages of 12-44 years old, all…